Philadelphia Seeking to Outlaw Skill Games at Pennsylvanian Corner Stores

Arsenii Anderson
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philadelphia seeking to outlaw skill games at pennsylvanian corner stores

A new measure that was just presented in Philadelphia would make it illegal to play skill games in certain areas of the city. The measure, introduced by Councilmember Curtis Jones last month, would restrict the number of Pennsylvania skill games available at corner and convenience shops.

The absence of consumer safeguards and the increase in crime in areas with skill game presences are the main reasons why a lot of politicians are very concerned about skill games, in addition to the fact that they drive away business from brick-and-mortar stores and online casinos in Pennsylvania.

If the law is approved, companies that meet certain requirements would still be able to provide these games.

A Public Safety Measure Aims to Limit Philadelphia’s PA Skill Gaming Market

The measure was filed by Councilmember Jones on January 26 and was approved by the Committee earlier this week. Since the bill is within the jurisdiction of the Committee on Public Safety, Pennsylvania casinos are not affected by this. It declared that any casino-style or skill game that takes cash in exchange for the possibility of receiving cash and isn’t otherwise governed by Pennsylvania state law is illegal for any company to run.

The bill suggests that in order for enterprises to lawfully provide skill games, they must adhere to a set of requirements. They are as follows:

  • Licensed facilities as authorized and defined in the Pennsylvania Race Horse Development and Gaming Act;
  • Any establishment with 30 seats or more that is regularly used by patrons to enjoy food and drinks and is operating under a valid Commonwealth license to sell alcohol.

All of the city’s corner and convenience shops would effectively be prohibited from offering skill games. Additionally, gas stations would not be allowed to do so as well. A company that violates the rule will have to pay a fine of $1,000 for each machine.

The measure is co-sponsored by ten members of the council.

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